Tag Archives: Andrew Davis

CCDTR Investigators publish JAMA clinical guideline synopsis of controversial glycemic control guideline statement

June 21, 2018- CCDTR Core Investigators Andrew Davis, MD, MPH, Elizabeth Tung, MD, MS, and Neda Laiteerapong, MD, MS have published a JAMA clinical guideline synopsis of the American College of Physicians’ controversial 2018 guidance statement on hemoglobin A1c goals in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. The article is entitled “Glycemic Control in Nonpregnant Adults with Type 2 Diabetes” and provides recommendations in response to the new guideline statement. In addition to their article, Dr. Tung and Dr. Laiteerapong are featured in a video discussing this same topic.

 

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American Diabetes Association publishes an update of its position statement on hypertension and diabetes in the September 2017 issue of Diabetes Care

September 13, 2017- The American Diabetes Association has published an update of its 2003 position statement on hypertension and diabetes in the September 2017 issue of Diabetes Care.  Led by George Bakris, MD of the University of Chicago Section of Endocrinology, and Director of the ASH Comprehensive Hypertension Center, the international writing group revised the guidelines in light of several recent landmark randomized trials. Greater emphasis was placed on the routine use of home blood pressure readings,  routine assessment of orthostatic pressure, and the cautious use of agents like spironolactone for resistant hypertension.  Andrew Davis, MD, a primary care internist at University of Chicago Medicine, also served on the writing group.

 

Researchers including CCDTR investigator Andrew Davis find three-target risk control in an RCT eliminated survival disparities in patients with initially poor control

October 2013 – A team of investigators including CCDTR investigator Dr. Andy Davis found that in a randomized controlled trial (RCT), significant race/ethnic differences in cardiac risk profiles that persisted during follow-up did not result in significant differences in 5-year death or death/MI/stroke. The findings were published in The American Journal of Cardiology. The article can be accessed here.